KIDDOCJJ
KIDDOCJJ
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REALLY EXCELLENT SANDWICH RYE

I love bread, but as a physician, I have to practice what I preach! There is such a thing as healthy baked goods when we infuse them with grains that matter. In this case, it's rye - a grain low in gluten (so it can't be the ONLY ingredient in your bread), capable of keeping insulin levels from going wacky, adding healthy fiber for a healthier colon, lowering cholesterol AND helping maintain a sense of fullness (satiety). Miracle worker, it is! And......IT'S DELICIOUS! So hubby and I have been on a serious rye bender over the last year and I wanted to share how to make some glorious loaves using a pullman pan (see below for explanation), and using a rye sour (no it's NOT a cocktail) to add rye, color, flavor and depth to this bread. A rye sour is really much easier to make than a standard sourdough starter. I've included a little video to show you how. Just begin your starter at least 2 days before baking your first loaves. Keep it covered up in the fridge and feed it weekly (instructions on the video).  Thanks to Zingerman's Bakehouse Cookbook for creating the rye sour technique. However, I have simplified their bread recipe so you can make this in your sleep!

No folks, this isn't a cocktail, but rather a way to make a bread starter from rye flour and some natural ingredients to jump start and flavor your rye loaves and baked goods.

KIDDOCJJ tip: you can also tie the cheesecloth with fishing line or a clean rubber band.

 
  WHAT YOU NEED:   - big bowl/wooden spoon or mixer with dough hook  - spice or coffee grinder  - 2 regular 9" loaf or pullman pans   INGREDIENTS:   - 500 gram rye sour  - 500 gram all-purpose flour  - 1 TB sea salt  - 2 tsp active dry yeast  - 2 TB caraway seeds + more for sprinkling  - 1 cup of water  - fine cornmeal

WHAT YOU NEED:

- big bowl/wooden spoon or mixer with dough hook

- spice or coffee grinder

- 2 regular 9" loaf or pullman pans

INGREDIENTS:

- 500 gram rye sour

- 500 gram all-purpose flour

- 1 TB sea salt

- 2 tsp active dry yeast

- 2 TB caraway seeds + more for sprinkling

- 1 cup of water

- fine cornmeal

  INSTRUCTIONS:   1.  Put 2 TB of caraway in a clean coffee grinder, spice grinder or mortar and pestle.  KIDDOCJJ tip:  If your grinder has residue from prior uses, just add a couple of TB of dry white uncooked rice to the grinder. Pulverize and dump the rice in the trash. The rice will pick up the oils and residue. Wipe clean with a paper towel. Now your grinder is clean, with no left behind odors.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1.  Put 2 TB of caraway in a clean coffee grinder, spice grinder or mortar and pestle.

KIDDOCJJ tip: If your grinder has residue from prior uses, just add a couple of TB of dry white uncooked rice to the grinder. Pulverize and dump the rice in the trash. The rice will pick up the oils and residue. Wipe clean with a paper towel. Now your grinder is clean, with no left behind odors.

 2. Process the caraway until it is fine, but you can still see some bits. The oils are released this way and add tons of flavor and texture to the bread dough.

2. Process the caraway until it is fine, but you can still see some bits. The oils are released this way and add tons of flavor and texture to the bread dough.

    KIDDOCJJ tip:   for those of you who are unfamiliar with a a Pullman Pan, here's one. These are wonderful when you are trying to make a perfectly square loaf of bread, like with brioche, or any sandwich loaf.  They can be used with their tops (that slide on and off), or topless!     If using loaf pans without tops, you'll have a pretty loaf as well, but with the characteristic curvy top.    

 

KIDDOCJJ tip:  for those of you who are unfamiliar with a a Pullman Pan, here's one. These are wonderful when you are trying to make a perfectly square loaf of bread, like with brioche, or any sandwich loaf.  They can be used with their tops (that slide on and off), or topless! 

If using loaf pans without tops, you'll have a pretty loaf as well, but with the characteristic curvy top.

 

 3.  Put the rye sour, all purpose flour, salt, yeast and caraway in the bowl of your mixer, or in a large mixing bowl.

3.  Put the rye sour, all purpose flour, salt, yeast and caraway in the bowl of your mixer, or in a large mixing bowl.

 4.  Mix on medium until your dough looks like dry clods of dirt, as above. If doing by hand, mix until it's shaggy.

4.  Mix on medium until your dough looks like dry clods of dirt, as above. If doing by hand, mix until it's shaggy.

 5.  Depending on the moisture level of your rye sour, you may or may not use the entire cup of water. So add approximately HALF your water now.

5.  Depending on the moisture level of your rye sour, you may or may not use the entire cup of water. So add approximately HALF your water now.

 6.  Mix or stir for a good 3-4 minutes. PATIENCE! as you'll be surprised that your dough may come together, leave the sides of the bowl clean and become a cohesive mass.  7.  If it doesn't add another ounce of water, mix or knead for 2-3 more minutes, and likely it will come together.

6.  Mix or stir for a good 3-4 minutes. PATIENCE! as you'll be surprised that your dough may come together, leave the sides of the bowl clean and become a cohesive mass.

7.  If it doesn't add another ounce of water, mix or knead for 2-3 more minutes, and likely it will come together.

 8.  Spray a large bowl with Pam or other vegetable spray.            

8.  Spray a large bowl with Pam or other vegetable spray.

 

 

 

 

 12.  Prep your pans by spraying them with oil. If using pullman pans, don't forget the inside of the lids.   13.  Sprinkle a TB or 2 of fine cornmeal in the bottom and tap to coat.

12.  Prep your pans by spraying them with oil. If using pullman pans, don't forget the inside of the lids. 

13.  Sprinkle a TB or 2 of fine cornmeal in the bottom and tap to coat.

 9.  Plop that dough down in the greased bowl.               

9.  Plop that dough down in the greased bowl.

 

 

 

 

 

Here's how to get those loaves structurally sound before loading them into your pullman pans. The folds will help each slice of rye have an even density - ever so important for sandwiches!

 10.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rest and rise for about an hour in the warmest corner of your kitchen.  KIDDOCJJ tip:   if you have multiple projects going on in the kitchen and your timers are all set to different endpoints, I like to label my plastic wrap so I can keep it all straight.    

10.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rest and rise for about an hour in the warmest corner of your kitchen.

KIDDOCJJ tip:  if you have multiple projects going on in the kitchen and your timers are all set to different endpoints, I like to label my plastic wrap so I can keep it all straight.

 

 14.  When the dough has almost reached the tops of the pans, preheat your oven to 400.  15.  Spray the tops of the unbaked loaves with water, and sprinkle a little cornmeal, some whole caraway seeds, and some coarse sea salt on top.   16. Replace the covers (if using pullman pans), turn the oven down to 350, and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover the pans and bake for another 5-7 minutes until tops are brown and internal temperature is 210-212.   17. Remove from the oven, take the loaves out of the pans and cool on a rack.

14.  When the dough has almost reached the tops of the pans, preheat your oven to 400.

15.  Spray the tops of the unbaked loaves with water, and sprinkle a little cornmeal, some whole caraway seeds, and some coarse sea salt on top. 

16. Replace the covers (if using pullman pans), turn the oven down to 350, and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover the pans and bake for another 5-7 minutes until tops are brown and internal temperature is 210-212. 

17. Remove from the oven, take the loaves out of the pans and cool on a rack.

 11.  You know rising has happened when your plastic wrap balloons up and the dough feels like a baby's bootie (trust me, as a Pediatrician, I have plenty of experience in this arena!).         

11.  You know rising has happened when your plastic wrap balloons up and the dough feels like a baby's bootie (trust me, as a Pediatrician, I have plenty of experience in this arena!).

 

 

 

 And there you have it, whether toasted or just sliced, a perfect SANDWICH RYE!  And if you're empty nesters like us, cut the loaves in half, wrap with saran, then heavy duty foil, and freeze them...otherwise there's a good possibility that loaf is gone, gone, gone in 60 seconds!  It's good for you. Trust me. I'm a Doctor!

And there you have it, whether toasted or just sliced, a perfect SANDWICH RYE!

And if you're empty nesters like us, cut the loaves in half, wrap with saran, then heavy duty foil, and freeze them...otherwise there's a good possibility that loaf is gone, gone, gone in 60 seconds!

It's good for you. Trust me. I'm a Doctor!