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LOBSTER STOCK

Summer time is lobster time for many who live in coastal areas.  After all the work extracting that precious lobster meat, more still lurks in the tiny recesses of the shells.  That's gold, baby!  So why not glean everything you can from your favorite crustacean and make a simple lobster stock. You will transform a risotto, a soup, a chowder, or a stew with this rich stock.

 
  INGREDIENTS:   - Shells from 2-3 lobsters  - 1 large onion, peeled, and roughly chopped  - 6 cloves garlic, smashed  - large pinch (1/2 tsp) red pepper flakes  -  6-8 sprigs fresh thyme  -  2 bay leaves  -  fennel fronds (if you have them)  -  14 ounce can whole tomatoes with their juice  -  bottle of dry white wine (1 glass for the chef, the rest for the stock)   

INGREDIENTS:

- Shells from 2-3 lobsters

- 1 large onion, peeled, and roughly chopped

- 6 cloves garlic, smashed

- large pinch (1/2 tsp) red pepper flakes

-  6-8 sprigs fresh thyme

-  2 bay leaves

-  fennel fronds (if you have them)

-  14 ounce can whole tomatoes with their juice

-  bottle of dry white wine (1 glass for the chef, the rest for the stock)

 

  INSTRUCTIONS:   1.  Cut lobster shells into 2-3 inch pieces with kitchen shears  2.  Drizzle 2 TB olive oil into a large stockpot with heat on medium-high.  3.  Throw in the shells, onion, garlic, and pepper flakes and stir periodically until onions are limp and translucent, but not brown.  4.  Add the thyme and bay leaves as well as the fennel fronds, and stir to mix.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1.  Cut lobster shells into 2-3 inch pieces with kitchen shears

2.  Drizzle 2 TB olive oil into a large stockpot with heat on medium-high.

3.  Throw in the shells, onion, garlic, and pepper flakes and stir periodically until onions are limp and translucent, but not brown.

4.  Add the thyme and bay leaves as well as the fennel fronds, and stir to mix.

 5.  Add the tomatoes with their juices to the pot, and crush the tomatoes with the back of a wooden spoon to release their juices.  6.  Pour yourself a glass of white wine, and pour the rest (about 20 ounces) into the pot.  Choose a wine that's dry (like a Chardonnay, pinot grigio, or chenin blanc).  7.  Add water until you are just shy of the pot's rim.  Bring to a boil, briefly, and then turn down to low.

5.  Add the tomatoes with their juices to the pot, and crush the tomatoes with the back of a wooden spoon to release their juices.

6.  Pour yourself a glass of white wine, and pour the rest (about 20 ounces) into the pot.  Choose a wine that's dry (like a Chardonnay, pinot grigio, or chenin blanc).

7.  Add water until you are just shy of the pot's rim.  Bring to a boil, briefly, and then turn down to low.

 8.  Simmer for 2 hours until stock is fragrant and tomatoes are broken up.  9.  Let cool briefly and then strain into a large container or bowl, cover, and refrigerate.  You'll see some protein settling on the bottom - just stir it back in when using your lobster stock.  Stock will last 3-4 days in the fridge and up to a year in the freezer.       STOCK TIP:    If your lobster shells have retained the "tomalley" (the green digestive organs) - be sure to toss those before starting your stock.  On the other hand, if there are red, tiny bead like eggs in the shell, use them! They add so much flavor, like caviar!

8.  Simmer for 2 hours until stock is fragrant and tomatoes are broken up.

9.  Let cool briefly and then strain into a large container or bowl, cover, and refrigerate.  You'll see some protein settling on the bottom - just stir it back in when using your lobster stock.

Stock will last 3-4 days in the fridge and up to a year in the freezer.

 

STOCK TIP:

If your lobster shells have retained the "tomalley" (the green digestive organs) - be sure to toss those before starting your stock.  On the other hand, if there are red, tiny bead like eggs in the shell, use them! They add so much flavor, like caviar!