KIDDOCJJ
KIDDOCJJ
EAT. LEARN. EXPLORE. INSPIRE.

CIABATTA - 101

My favorite bread in the whole world is ciabatta. It's the ultimate comfort bread - pillowy, light, filled with air and packed with flavor. It's as much at home on an elegant table as it is split in two and made into a beautiful layered sandwich. Leftover or slightly stale ciabatta makes incredible croutons, can be used in a bread salad or ground into luscious breadcrumbs. No need for perfection here....the more organic the shape of your loaves, the more exciting they are to eat!

january 14, 2018

  WHAT YOU NEED:   - Oven with baking stone + sheet pan  OR  - 1-2 cast iron pots or pans with lids  - Stand mixer with paddle  - plastic dough scraper or spatula  -large bowl or plastic container with a lid   

WHAT YOU NEED:

- Oven with baking stone + sheet pan

OR

- 1-2 cast iron pots or pans with lids

- Stand mixer with paddle

- plastic dough scraper or spatula

-large bowl or plastic container with a lid

 

  INGREDIENTS:   - 2 1/2 cups unbleached  all purpose flour  (bleached flour has a metallic taste)  - 1 tsp fine sea  salt   - 1 tsp instant  yeast  (I use SAF)  - 1 1/4c  water  at room temperature  - 1/4 cup bubbly  Biga    - extra virgin olive oil    INSTRUCTIONS:   1.  Put the  Biga  and the  water  in the bowl of your stand mixer. Attach the paddle and beat on low until the biga is broken up and incorporated in the water. Stop the mixer.

INGREDIENTS:

- 2 1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour (bleached flour has a metallic taste)

- 1 tsp fine sea salt

- 1 tsp instant yeast (I use SAF)

- 1 1/4c water at room temperature

- 1/4 cup bubbly Biga

- extra virgin olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

1.  Put the Biga and the water in the bowl of your stand mixer. Attach the paddle and beat on low until the biga is broken up and incorporated in the water. Stop the mixer.

 2. Now add the flour and yeast, mix on low for about a minute, then crank up your mixer to high and beat for 4 minutes until the dough looks very elastic (like a thick spider web).  3. Add the salt and continue to beat until the dough separates from the sides of the bowl and clings to your paddle. If it doesn't start to cling and crawl up your paddle, add more flour, a TB at a time, beat briefly - until the mix starts to adhere to the paddle.

2. Now add the flour and yeast, mix on low for about a minute, then crank up your mixer to high and beat for 4 minutes until the dough looks very elastic (like a thick spider web).

3. Add the salt and continue to beat until the dough separates from the sides of the bowl and clings to your paddle. If it doesn't start to cling and crawl up your paddle, add more flour, a TB at a time, beat briefly - until the mix starts to adhere to the paddle.

 4.  Generously coat a bowl or plastic container with  extra virgin olive oil  and with your spatula or plastic dough scraper, coax the dough into the oiled bowl.  5. Eyeball where the dough is and once it is doubled in volume and super bubbly it's ready to shape. (tip: I put mine in a container I can see through and use a marker on the outside to see the starting point).

4.  Generously coat a bowl or plastic container with extra virgin olive oil and with your spatula or plastic dough scraper, coax the dough into the oiled bowl.

5. Eyeball where the dough is and once it is doubled in volume and super bubbly it's ready to shape. (tip: I put mine in a container I can see through and use a marker on the outside to see the starting point).

 6. Heavily flour a work surface (I recommend placing the flour in a sheet pan to control the mess) and turn the risen dough onto the flour. Cut the dough in half with your scraper. Stretch each gently into a long shape, flour their bottoms well, and cover with a tea towel.  7. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. If using a stone, also preheat at large sheet pan. If baking in cast iron preheat the pans AND lids too.  8. Once the loaves have doubled in size and are bubbly, it's time to bake them.

6. Heavily flour a work surface (I recommend placing the flour in a sheet pan to control the mess) and turn the risen dough onto the flour. Cut the dough in half with your scraper. Stretch each gently into a long shape, flour their bottoms well, and cover with a tea towel.

7. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. If using a stone, also preheat at large sheet pan. If baking in cast iron preheat the pans AND lids too.

8. Once the loaves have doubled in size and are bubbly, it's time to bake them.

 9. Once risen,  the dough is really wobbly, so flour your hands and forearms, scoop one baby loaf up (or use a long spatula) and flip it over gently on to your stone or in a cast iron vessel (that way the floured bottom is now on top). Repeat with the other loaf (and BTW if you only have one cast iron, you can bake these back to back - no worries!).  10. Immediately cover the loaves with either the heated sheet pan turned upside down, or with the cast iron lids.  11. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Remove to a cooling rack.   11. If you are like me, immediately put on a bib, get out the butter, and enjoy one of the loaves before your family can make it to the kitchen.  12. These are so good, you'll never buy ciabatta again! Doctor's orders!

9. Once risen,  the dough is really wobbly, so flour your hands and forearms, scoop one baby loaf up (or use a long spatula) and flip it over gently on to your stone or in a cast iron vessel (that way the floured bottom is now on top). Repeat with the other loaf (and BTW if you only have one cast iron, you can bake these back to back - no worries!).

10. Immediately cover the loaves with either the heated sheet pan turned upside down, or with the cast iron lids.

11. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Remove to a cooling rack. 

11. If you are like me, immediately put on a bib, get out the butter, and enjoy one of the loaves before your family can make it to the kitchen.

12. These are so good, you'll never buy ciabatta again! Doctor's orders!